Donations and bequests

Donations

The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG) is Tasmania’s leading natural and cultural heritage organisation. It is a combined museum, art gallery and herbarium which safeguards the physical evidence of Tasmania’s natural and cultural heritage, and the cultural identity of Tasmanians.

TMAG is Australia’s second-oldest museum and has its origins in the collections of Australia’s oldest scientific society, the Royal Society of Tasmania, established in 1843. The first permanent home of the museum opened on the corner of Argyle and Macquarie streets in 1863 and the museum has gradually expanded from this corner to occupy the entire city block.

The TMAG precinct is one of Australia’s most historically significant sites.  Included in the precinct is Tasmania’s oldest surviving public building, the 1808-10 Commissariat Store; the Private Secretary’s Cottage, built prior to 1815 and originally adjacent to old Government House; and Tasmania’s first federal building, the 1902 Custom House.

At TMAG we care for the State Collections of Tasmania: almost 800,000 objects as diverse as fossils and fine art. Our collections represent the essence of our society’s values and are a major reference point for Tasmanians to gain a greater appreciation of what it means to be Tasmanian and to understand our place within the global community.

TMAG aims to:

  • Provide an environment that both stimulates and educates the general public;
  • Collect and conserve material evidence within the areas of humanities, including visual arts, history and anthropology, and the biological and physical sciences;
  • Undertake research on the collections within changing intellectual, social and environmental contexts; and
  • Interpret and present its collections and research through diverse programs and publications which provide opportunity for public access and participation.

TMAG is governed by a Board of Trustees and sits within the State Government Department of State Growth. To fulfil our role as custodians of the state collection, TMAG relies not only on government funding and corporate sponsorship, but also on the generosity of individuals and philanthropists who make donations and bequests to the museum.

Through the generosity of all donors, objects that help define us and our community are in public hands, safeguarded for current and future generations.

Image:
Clockwork toy fire engine c.1925
Tipp & Co, Germany
tinplate